Freedom Trail

Freedom Trail

The Freedom Trail in Boston, MA, traces the historic sites that led to the United States Revolution. Special hotel packages along the trail allow visitors to stay close to some of the most popular attractions. Visitors can download information about the Trail before they go to Boston so that they have plenty of information about the Trail and all of its historic significance, or they can wait until they get to town to learn the history from guides who are dressed in period costumes.

You don't have to start at the beginning of the Freedom Trail and work your way to the end chronologically. Since the Trail is spread out across Boston, you can visit any of the anchor sites in any combination that you prefer. There are 16 specific locations that house museums or landmarks. These special sites can be visited independently or as part of a tour of the entire Trail. If your time is limited, you can choose one or two special buildings or locations and enjoy a longer, more in-depth visit. Literature and guides are available at each of the destinations.

The Freedom Trail involves historic locations indoors and outdoors. The Trail winds through the oldest streets in Boston, taking visitors from one building or historic site to another. Markers along the trail will keep you headed in the right direction from beginning to end. The Trail begins at the Boston Common, the legendary starting point for the Revolutionary War. From there, you will be led through the State House, King's Chapel, the Old South Meeting House, Paul Revere's Home, the site of the Boston Massacre, and other important landmarks until you reach the end of the tour at the USS Constitution. Interactive educational areas have been set aside to teach visitors more about each site along the way.

Trail guides are actors who dress up in the style of the 18th century Boston residents who experienced the history firsthand. On special occasions and during the busier times of the year, some actors will dress as the more famous players in the revolution. It is not unusual to see Benjamin Franklin or Paul Revere walking the Freedom Trail during the summer months. These historic guides will remain in character and can be a fun way to glimpse what life might have been like during the earliest years of America's fight for independence.